BET’s Robert L. Johnson Offers New Plan for African American Employment

[fblike layout_style=’standard’ show_faces=’false’ verb=’like’ font=’arial’ color_scheme=’light’]BET's Robert L. Johnson

BET’s Robert L. Johnson Offers New Plan for African American Employment

 

Black Entertainment Television (BET) founder, Robert L. Johnson, certainly knows how to succeed in business. He created the cornerstone African American focused television station in 1980 and it continues to be the main network for rap and hip hop music and urban-themed movies and television series, viewed in over 90 million homes worldwide. Under Johnson’s leadership the network became the first Black-owned business on the New York Stock Exchange and Johnson became one of the wealthiest African Americans in the country. In 2001 he became the country’s first African American billionaire, even before selling the network to Viacom in 2003 for a reported $3 billion. Though he has received harsh criticism for some of BET’s content and for selling the network to Viacom, a non-Black mega-corporation, his business savvy and capacity to amass wealth can not be denied.

Now Johnson offers a plan for getting more African Americans into positions that will bring them the wealth he has enjoyed. The plan he is proposing is similar to “the Roooney Rule” of the NFL, a 2003 strategy adopted to bring in more African American coaches. In a press release Johnson stated, “The RLJ Rule is principally designed to encourage companies to voluntarily establish a ‘best practices’ policy to identify and interview the tremendous talent pool of African American managers and African American companies that are often overlooked because of traditional hiring or procurement practices.” It is Johnson’s goal to get more African Americans into high-ranking corporate positions and increase the amount of African American firms receiving corporate vendor supply and service contracts. He is asking that corporations commit to interviewing at least two African American individuals or firms whenever positions are available.

This strategy is intended to have a trickle-down effect, African Americans in high ranking positions are more likely to employ other people of color, but it neglects the overwhelming number of African Americans without a bachelor’s or graduate’s degree that are currently unemployed and would not immediately benefit from the plan. Perhaps Johnson’s plan is plausible for long-term improvements, but for those who are not qualified (or interested) in a high-ranking corporate position and need immediate employment what should they do, sit home and watch BET?

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2 comments
Sara
Sara

Going to college or learning a trade is, of course, their best bet. I was a starving college student and put myself through college, and also paid for a master's degree as a single mom of three. The less money you have the better the financial aid...so get going! It is not easy, but it sure beats a lifetime of poverty.

ANN ROY
ANN ROY

I saw you this moring on msnbc or cnn and what you said about jobs for black americans touch my heart, and i think thats why your so successful.
I'm a small business owner, I'm a fashion designer,and I'm a black woman. I can't wait to employ as many employees as i can as soon as possible. Thank you for being the kind of person you are!

I can't stand to see homeless people, thats why i help as mush as can and give as much i can. I feel know one wants to be down and out.
Ann Roy/Fashion Designer/anndesigns@tx.rr.com